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Om Netværket

Nordisk Netværk for Avantgardestudier er et nordisk forskningsnetværk støttet af Nordforsk 2004-2007. Nordisk Netværk for Avantgarde Studier vil styrke og koordinere mindre og spredte nationale forskningsmiljøer, bidrage til at fremme udveksling af viden om forskelle og ligheder mellem de nordiske lande og gøre nordisk avantgardeforskning internationalt synlig. Nordisk Netværk for Avantgardestudier afholder en årlig konference. Netværket danner også ramme for udarbejdelsen af De nordiske avantgarders kulturhistorie i 4 bind og et elektronisk arkiv for dokumenter fra de nordiske avantgarder. Det nordiske forskningsnetværk er en videreudvikling af det danske forskningsnetværk ”Avantgardernes genkomst og aktualitet” støttet af Det humanistiske Forskningsråd 2001-2004. Under forberedelse er et Europæisk Netværk for Avantgarde og Modernisme Studier, EAM, hvis første konference afholdes i Ghent, Belgien, maj 2008.

About the Network

The Nordic Network of Avant-Garde Studies is supported by Nordforsk 2004-2007. The Nordic Network of Avant-Garde Studies aims to support and coordinate small and dispersed national centres of research, help promote the exchange of knowledge about differences and similarities among the avant-garde currents and research in the Nordic countries, and make Nordic avant-garde research visible in a European and international context. The Nordic Network of Avant-Garde Studies has a yearly conference. Within the Network an editorial group is preparing a four-volume Cultural History of the Nordic Avant-Gardes and an electronic archive of documents from the Nordic avant-gardes. The Nordic network is an extension of the Danish research network ”The Return and Actuality of the Avant-Gardes” supported by the Danish Research Council 2001-2004. A European Network of Avant-Garde and Modernism Studies, EAM, is under preparation and will have its first conference in Ghent in May 2008.
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EAM newsletter * bulletin * Rundbrief

News * nouvelles * Nachricht 

MATERIALMEANINGS 

Third Biannual conference of the European Network for Avant-Garde and Modernism Studies (EAM) * 7-9 September 2012 * the University of Kent, Canterbury, UK * 

http://www.kent.ac.uk/english/materialmeanings/index.html  

This conference investigates the avant-garde's reconfiguration of matter and materials in the quest to generate new meanings and effects. Its particular focus will be the manner in which different artistic disciplines adopt strategies, theories and techniques from each other, and how they translate, transform and integrate conceptions and modes of expression from other sign systems. Proposals are invited for contributions which deal with any of the following: the interference or conflict of artistic disciplines; the interaction of disciplines in artistic movements; the combination of media in single artworks or artistic practices; the treatment of sign as matter and matter as sign; the materiality of art and the art of materiality; art and material environment; the world as matter and meaning; text as thing, things as texts; the transfiguration of traditional or found materials; the material effectivity of the avant-garde; the relationship between manifestos and art; technology and the transformation of meaning; the incorporation of the foreign or extraneous. We welcome contributions across all areas of avant-garde activity: art, literature, music, architecture, film, artistic and social movements, lifestyle, television, fashion, drama, performance, activism, design and technology. We especially welcome contributions which explore the combination of different media or practices within a single work or within a given environment. Please subscribe to the conference email list: https://lists.kent.ac.uk/sympa/info/eam-2012-cfp

Read or download the entire newsletter 

 

CFP: TRANSFERS, APPROPRIATIONS AND FUNCTIONS OF AVANT-GARDE IN CENTRAL AND NORTHERN EUROPE, 1909-1989

International colloquium organised by Centre Interuniversitaire d’Études Hongroises et Finlandaises (CIEH&CIEFi – Paris 3) & l’Institut Finlandais de Paris 

Paris

Septembre / September 23-24, 2011

 

 The colloquium aims to lay the foundations for an international research program. The colloquium focuses on the functions of avant-gardes as well as on the transfers and appropriations of influences and intertexts in Central and Northern Europe in the period running from 1909 to the end of the Cold War. Avant-garde is here understood according to its two traditional interpretations as an artistic or literary movement that is willing either to take the role of “engaged art” promoting political and social progress or to position itself as a reflective, critical and even destructive element within modernisation.

Given the diversity of the political systems in the geographical area in question, situated between Germany and Russia and stretching from the Balkans to the Nordic countries, it is clear that these two aspects of avant-garde have seen varying realisations. The very fact, however, that artists and writers in such profoundly different countries as for example Finland, Poland and Hungary have defined themselves as belonging to or being at the “avant-garde” (or as representing a specific avant-garde movement or one of its variants like the “underground”) calls for research that takes into consideration both the differences and the similarities in the multiplicity of motivations, contexts and traditions as well as in the desire to connect and identify with a transnational phenomenon. The colloquium will thus not focus on the avant-garde, but on the avant-gardes, not on one movement or canon, but on a polycentric network with multiple local knots and contextual functions.

The three notions of “transfer”, “appropriation” and “function” are proposed as methodological tools or perspectives in focusing on the topic. On the one hand, the aim will be to understand how, through which channels of communication and through which schemes of interpretation, influences and intertexts crucial for the development of the avant-gardes have been transferred from one country and cultural environment to another. On the other hand, one has to analyse how these influences and intertexts have been appropriated and transformed in artistic and literary production, and further what functions avant-gardes have had in different societies and contexts of art and literature (for ex. criticism of consumer society in Finland, resistance to totalitarianism in the East). Focus can also be on “negative cases” marked by the resistance to and explicit condemnation of avant-gardes.

Alongside of the analysis of specific historical cases, the colloquium welcomes epistemological and historical reflections on the relations between the centre and the periphery, reflections that will not reproduce the often criticized models of “dominating vs. dominated” or “sending vs. receiving country”, but instead will emphasize the multiple, reciprocal and productive aspects in the relations between countries. The colloquium will also seek to develop, reorient and deepen the discussion on the “literary Europe” that was started after the fall of the Berlin wall and has been further spurred with the enlargement of the European Union in 1995, 2004 and 2007. This discussion has mostly focused on Central Europe and the Balkans and on the role of “national” literatures in political and cultural history. Displacing the focus towards the North and on the avant-gardes, which consist to a large extent of critical and transgressive artistic practices and which have developed in international networks, will permit to understand better the tensions and articulations between national identities and international connections as well as the aesthetic values and strategies of contestation or resistance avant-gardes have been connected with. Although some publications on the avant-gardes of Northern and Eastern Europe have been published recently or are in the press, the work remains largely undone.

The official languages of the conference are French and English.

The primary research fields invited to participate are: history of art, literary studies and comparative literature, history, history of ideas, semiotics, discourse analysis, and translation studies.

Participation fee: 30 euros (covers colloquium material, coffee breaks and one lunch).

The organisers will put 4 travel and accommodation grants at the disposition of participants.

A peer-reviewed selection of articles based on the colloquium presentations will be published as a special issue of the Cahiers de la Nouvelle Europe.

Researchers willing to present their work at the colloquium are invited to send, by March 31, 2011, an abstract of maximum 400 words (along with contact information, name and institutional affiliation) to the selection committee at the address <harri.veivo@helsinki.fi>. Those applying for a grant are invited to send also a 3-page CV and list of publications.

“Ah, Mr Trouble…,” the Alphabet: A Symposium on Ron Silliman’s Long Poem

CALL FOR PAPERS
please circulate

25-26 March 2011
University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada
      “I’m not writing for ‘a small circle of friends,’ I’m writing to you.”

After three decades of composition, Ron Silliman’s the Alphabet is complete, and published under one cover (University of Alabama Press, 2008). When this twenty-six-sectioned, thousand-plus-page poem was only available in discrete portions, in magazines, chapbooks, limited-run books, what punctuated each was not the poem’s next “new sentence” but concurrent claims and counterclaims on contemporary life.the Alphabet was written during decades when high theory and cultural studies had arrived in the academy to exact formal and mostly progressive social evaluations from culture and the arts, but still often at the expense of poetry’s own theoretical challenges to the academy’s institutional base; when intensified corporate consolidation of the mass media and new technologies were transforming existing paradigms of “the consumer society” (Baudrillard), its “captains of consciousness” (Ewen), and “culture of narcissism” (Lasch); and when, among other factors, manufactured consent (theorized equally by Burawoy for factory work as by Chomsky and Herman for mass media) propelled the US mainstream rightwards into postmodern politics. 

Specific responses to claims by these dominant narratives (to pick just three) from the post-Vietnam War era are to be found among poets associated with Language Poetry (a label in part projected from such narratives) and other contemporaneous groupings and tendencies. But even in a given contextual and interpretive frame such as this one, loose and incomplete as it is in this version but in which some idea of ideological mediation prevails, how is it that one thing the Alphabet does is embody perceptions of a sensible world (“the way old gum leaves its spotted shadow on the cement”), which is a poetic task much older than and yet foundational to “the ideology of the aesthetic” (in Eagleton’s title phrase)? I offer this long-debated question of art’s function – “to strengthen the perceptive faculties and free them from encumbrance” (to quote Pound on Dante, from almost a century ago) – as an example of how the Alphabet’s singularities and influences may re-illuminate received verities regarding the politics of aesthetic forms in Language Poetry’s milieu. Put another way, once timely and key discursive interventions associated with Silliman’s name and context—such as use of theory in poetry, “ethnography” of the everyday, critiques of accessible communication modes and of speech-based subjectivization, poetics of ideological mediation—may require further elaboration, or rethinking, if not their significance re-calibrated, in the face of this poem’s challenges. For, arguably, Silliman’s reputation, even notoriety, as critic, theorist, exponent of poetry’s production as a socially relevant and collective act, has preceded and to a degree guided how the poetry is to be received. But if a reader responds to the poetry, then how and what does she or he see and hear? “I’m writing to you,” the text says in the section called “Lit.” So, what is reading the Alphabet “like,” for you? 

This symposium aims to invite readings of Ron Silliman’s long poem, the Alphabet, and encourages critical engagements with its formal and socio-historical/-ideological dynamics as well as with its contexts and interpretive frames that have accrued around the author’s time and work. Papers on any issue focussed on or around the Alphabet or an aspect thereof are welcome, including but not limited to those addressing how the Alphabet engages elements of
      • language (poetic language and form, grammar, syntax, pun, cliché, description, reference, etc)
      • narrative / anti-narrative / story
      • representation (recalling Stuart Hall’s constructionist sense of “the active work of selecting and presenting, of structuring and shaping: not merely the transmitting of already-existing meaning, but the more active labour of making things mean,” “things” including class stratification, gender construction, whiteness / racialization, etc)
      • the aesthetic (& form; & ideology; & the body; & perception)
      • the social (historical; sociological; psychological; poetic)
      • nature (landscape, description, etc)
      • realism (& 19C / 20C codes of “the reality effect”; & knowing)
      • the unconscious (political, etc)
      • genre (long poems, prose poems, novels, lyrics, etc)
      • group & individual affiliation / disaffiliation (Language Poets / Language Writing / Language School; contemporaries in the poetic field such as Rae Armantrout, Rachel Blau DuPlessis, Leslie Scalapino, etc)
      • “tradition” (e.g.: Whitman, Thoreau; first-, second-generation modernists such as H.D., Reznikoff; “New American Poets” such as Whalen, Olson, Spicer; etc)
      • non-US poetry & poetics in/from Canada (e.g.: Kootenay School of Writing; Toronto Research Group; “the Canadian long poem”), China, Russia, France, Australia, England, etc
      • theory (postmodernity / postmodernism / modernism / modernity / globalization)
      • “after” (after theory; after “the American century”; after Language poetics; after “21st-century modernism”; etc)

Please send 300-500-word abstracts for twenty-minute papers, or detailed proposals for panels, by 1 Nov 2010 to Louis Cabri at lcabri@uwindsor.ca 

CFP: Structures of Innovation

MSA13, Oct 6-9 2011

The organizers of MSA 13 invite proposals for panels, round tables, and seminars for inclusion in the thirteenth annual meeting of the Modernist Studies Association, to be held at the Hyatt Hotel in Buffalo, New York, October 6-9, 2011.

This year’s theme, “Structures of Innovation,” encourages the exploration of modernist innovation in literature, film, music, architecture, visual and performing arts, technology and industry, and the intersection of these fields with race, gender, the sciences, and law. An international border city, Buffalo has been home to many important poets, fiction writers, musicians, journalists, architects, and a center for visual and performing arts, as well as the site of various transportation and industrial innovations important to local, national, and global modernity. We welcome proposals having to do with modernist innovation, modernist structures, or modernist structures of innovation in all fields. This theme should in no way discourage proposals on other topics: we welcome all panel, seminar, and roundtable proposals. The primary criterion for selection will be the quality of the proposal, not its link to the conference theme.

All queries should be directed to msa13@buffalo.edu. 

All those who attend the MSA conference must be members of the organization with dues paid for 2011-12. (MSA membership runs from July 1 until June 30 each year.)

Because we wish to involve as many people as possible as active participants, MSA limits multiple appearances on the program. Thus, you may participate once, but only once, in each of the following categories:

• Seminar, either as leader or as presenter
• Panel or roundtable, as participant (you may also chair a different panel or roundtable)
• “What Are You Reading?” session

You may lead a seminar, present a paper on a panel, and participate in a “What Are You Reading” session, but you may not present two papers. MSA rules do not allow panel or roundtable organizers to chair their own session if they are also speaking in the session. The session chair must be someone who is otherwise not participating in the session. Panel organizers are encouraged to identify a moderator and include this information with their proposals; the MSA Program Committee can also ask another conference attendee to serve as a moderator.

CALL FOR SEMINAR PROPOSALS

Deadline: Feb. 15, 2011

Leading a Seminar: (Information for Seminar Leaders)
Seminars are one the most significant features of the MSA conference. Participants write brief “position papers” (5-7 pages) that are read and circulated prior to the conference. Because their size is limited to 15 participants, seminars generate lively exchange and often facilitate future collaborations. The format also allows a larger number of conference attendees to seek financial support from their institutions as they educate themselves and their colleagues on subjects of mutual interest. Seminars are two hours in length. Seminars led solely by graduate students are not likely to be accepted. We encourage graduate students to invite a faculty member to lead the seminar with them.

Please note that this is the call for seminar leaders. Sign-up for seminar participants will take place on a first-come, first-served basis coinciding with registration for the conference.

Seminar Topics:
There are no limits on topics, but past experience has shown that the more clearly defined the topic and the more guidance provided by the leader, the more productive the discussion. “Clearly defined” should not be confused with “narrow,” as extremely narrow seminar topics tend to exclude many potential applicants. To scan past seminar topics, go to the Conference Archives http://msa.press.jhu.edu/conference.html on the MSA website, click the link to a prior conference, and then click on “Conference Schedule” or “Conference Program.” You'll find seminars listed along with panels and other events.

Proposing a Seminar:
Seminar proposals must be submitted via email and must include the following information. Please assist us by sending this information in exactly the order given here:

* Use as a subject line: SEMINAR PROPOSAL / [LAST NAME OF SEMINAR LEADER] (e.g., SEMINAR PROPOSAL / GORMAN)
* List the seminar leader's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, mailing address, phone, fax, and e-mail address
* Provide a brief curriculum vitae (including teaching experience) for the seminar leader
* Give a brief description (up to 100 words) of the proposed topic
Submit proposals by Feb. 15, 2011 to: msa13@buffalo.edu

CALL FOR PANEL PROPOSALS

Deadline: April 15, 2011

Topics are not limited to the theme “Modernist Networks.” Successful proposals will introduce topics that promise to expand research and debate on a topic, and will present a clear rationale for the papers’ collective goal. Please bear in mind these guidelines:

* We encourage interdisciplinary panels and discourage panels on single authors.
* In order to encourage discussion, preference will be given to panels with three participants, though panels of four will be considered.
* Panels composed entirely of participants from a single department at a single institution are not likely to be accepted.
* Graduate students are welcome as panelists. However, panels composed entirely of graduate students are less likely to be accepted than panels that include presenters with degrees together with graduate students.

Proposals for panels must be submitted via email and must include the following information. Please assist us by sending this information in exactly the order given here:

* Use as a subject line: PANEL PROPOSAL / [LAST NAME OF PANEL ORGANIZER] (e.g., PANEL PROPOSAL / GORMAN)
* Session title
* Session organizer's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, mailing address, phone, fax, and e-mail address
* Chair's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, and contact information (if you do not identify a chair, we will locate one for you)
* Panelists' names, paper titles, institutional affiliations, disciplines, positions or titles, and contact information
* A maximum 500-word abstract of the panel as a whole
* Brief (2-3 sentence) scholarly biography of each panelist

Submit proposals by April 15, 2011 to: msa13@buffalo.edu

CALL FOR ROUNDTABLE PROPOSALS

Deadline: April 15, 2011

Unlike panels, which generally feature a sequence of 15-20 minute talks followed by discussion, roundtables gather a group of participants around a shared concern in order to generate discussion among the roundtable participants and with the audience. To this end, instead of delivering full-length papers, participants are asked to deliver short position statements in response to questions distributed in advance by the organizer, or they take turns responding to prompts from the moderator. The bulk of the session should be devoted to discussion. No paper titles are listed in the program, only the names of participants.

Other MSA roundtable policies:

* Roundtables may feature as many as 6 speakers.
* We particularly welcome roundtables featuring participants from multiple disciplines, and we discourage roundtables on single authors.
* Panels composed entirely of participants from a single department at a single institution are not likely to be accepted.
* Graduate students are welcome as speakers. However, roundtables composed entirely of graduate students are less likely to be accepted than roundtables that include degreed presenters together with graduate students.

Proposals for panels must be submitted via email and must include the following information. Please assist us by sending this information in exactly the order given here:

* Use as a subject line: ROUNDTABLE PROPOSAL / [LAST NAME OF ROUNDTABLE ORGANIZER] (e.g., ROUNDTABLE PROPOSAL / GORMAN)
* Session title
* Session organizer's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, mailing address, phone, fax, and e-mail address
* Moderator's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, and contact information (if you do not identify a moderator, we will locate one for you)
* Speakers' names, institutional affiliations, disciplines, positions or titles, mailing addresses, phones, faxes, and e-mail addresses
* A maximum 500-word rationale for the roundtable
* Brief (2-3 sentence) scholarly biography of each speaker


Send proposals by April 15, 2011 To: msa13@buffalo.edu

CFP: Structures of Innovation MSA13, Oct 6-9 2011

The organizers of MSA 13 invite proposals for panels, round tables, and seminars for inclusion in the thirteenth annual meeting of the Modernist Studies Association, to be held at the Hyatt Hotel in Buffalo, New York, October 6-9, 2011.

This year’s theme, “Structures of Innovation,” encourages the exploration of modernist innovation in literature, film, music, architecture, visual and performing arts, technology and industry, and the intersection of these fields with race, gender, the sciences, and law. An international border city, Buffalo has been home to many important poets, fiction writers, musicians, journalists, architects, and a center for visual and performing arts, as well as the site of various transportation and industrial innovations important to local, national, and global modernity. We welcome proposals having to do with modernist innovation, modernist structures, or modernist structures of innovation in all fields. This theme should in no way discourage proposals on other topics: we welcome all panel, seminar, and roundtable proposals. The primary criterion for selection will be the quality of the proposal, not its link to the conference theme.

All queries should be directed to msa13@buffalo.edu.

All those who attend the MSA conference must be members of the organization with dues paid for 2011-12. (MSA membership runs from July 1 until June 30 each year.)

Because we wish to involve as many people as possible as active participants, MSA limits multiple appearances on the program. Thus, you may participate once, but only once, in each of the following categories:

• Seminar, either as leader or as presenter
• Panel or roundtable, as participant (you may also chair a different panel or roundtable)
• “What Are You Reading?” session

You may lead a seminar, present a paper on a panel, and participate in a “What Are You Reading” session, but you may not present two papers. MSA rules do not allow panel or roundtable organizers to chair their own session if they are also speaking in the session. The session chair must be someone who is otherwise not participating in the session. Panel organizers are encouraged to identify a moderator and include this information with their proposals; the MSA Program Committee can also ask another conference attendee to serve as a moderator.

CALL FOR SEMINAR PROPOSALS

Deadline: Feb. 15, 2011

Leading a Seminar: (Information for Seminar Leaders)
Seminars are one the most significant features of the MSA conference. Participants write brief “position papers” (5-7 pages) that are read and circulated prior to the conference. Because their size is limited to 15 participants, seminars generate lively exchange and often facilitate future collaborations. The format also allows a larger number of conference attendees to seek financial support from their institutions as they educate themselves and their colleagues on subjects of mutual interest. Seminars are two hours in length. Seminars led solely by graduate students are not likely to be accepted. We encourage graduate students to invite a faculty member to lead the seminar with them.

Please note that this is the call for seminar leaders. Sign-up for seminar participants will take place on a first-come, first-served basis coinciding with registration for the conference.

Seminar Topics:
There are no limits on topics, but past experience has shown that the more clearly defined the topic and the more guidance provided by the leader, the more productive the discussion. “Clearly defined” should not be confused with “narrow,” as extremely narrow seminar topics tend to exclude many potential applicants. To scan past seminar topics, go to the Conference Archives http://msa.press.jhu.edu/conference.html on the MSA website, click the link to a prior conference, and then click on “Conference Schedule” or “Conference Program.” You'll find seminars listed along with panels and other events.

Proposing a Seminar:
Seminar proposals must be submitted via email and must include the following information. Please assist us by sending this information in exactly the order given here:

* Use as a subject line: SEMINAR PROPOSAL / [LAST NAME OF SEMINAR LEADER] (e.g., SEMINAR PROPOSAL / GORMAN)
* List the seminar leader's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, mailing address, phone, fax, and e-mail address
* Provide a brief curriculum vitae (including teaching experience) for the seminar leader
* Give a brief description (up to 100 words) of the proposed topic
Submit proposals by Feb. 15, 2011 to: msa13@buffalo.edu

CALL FOR PANEL PROPOSALS

Deadline: April 15, 2011

Topics are not limited to the theme “Modernist Networks.” Successful proposals will introduce topics that promise to expand research and debate on a topic, and will present a clear rationale for the papers’ collective goal. Please bear in mind these guidelines:

* We encourage interdisciplinary panels and discourage panels on single authors.
* In order to encourage discussion, preference will be given to panels with three participants, though panels of four will be considered.
* Panels composed entirely of participants from a single department at a single institution are not likely to be accepted.
* Graduate students are welcome as panelists. However, panels composed entirely of graduate students are less likely to be accepted than panels that include presenters with degrees together with graduate students.

Proposals for panels must be submitted via email and must include the following information. Please assist us by sending this information in exactly the order given here:

* Use as a subject line: PANEL PROPOSAL / [LAST NAME OF PANEL ORGANIZER] (e.g., PANEL PROPOSAL / GORMAN)
* Session title
* Session organizer's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, mailing address, phone, fax, and e-mail address
* Chair's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, and contact information (if you do not identify a chair, we will locate one for you)
* Panelists' names, paper titles, institutional affiliations, disciplines, positions or titles, and contact information
* A maximum 500-word abstract of the panel as a whole
* Brief (2-3 sentence) scholarly biography of each panelist

Submit proposals by April 15, 2011 to: msa13@buffalo.edu

CALL FOR ROUNDTABLE PROPOSALS

Deadline: April 15, 2011

Unlike panels, which generally feature a sequence of 15-20 minute talks followed by discussion, roundtables gather a group of participants around a shared concern in order to generate discussion among the roundtable participants and with the audience. To this end, instead of delivering full-length papers, participants are asked to deliver short position statements in response to questions distributed in advance by the organizer, or they take turns responding to prompts from the moderator. The bulk of the session should be devoted to discussion. No paper titles are listed in the program, only the names of participants.

Other MSA roundtable policies:

* Roundtables may feature as many as 6 speakers.
* We particularly welcome roundtables featuring participants from multiple disciplines, and we discourage roundtables on single authors.
* Panels composed entirely of participants from a single department at a single institution are not likely to be accepted.
* Graduate students are welcome as speakers. However, roundtables composed entirely of graduate students are less likely to be accepted than roundtables that include degreed presenters together with graduate students.

Proposals for panels must be submitted via email and must include the following information. Please assist us by sending this information in exactly the order given here:

* Use as a subject line: ROUNDTABLE PROPOSAL / [LAST NAME OF ROUNDTABLE ORGANIZER] (e.g., ROUNDTABLE PROPOSAL / GORMAN)
* Session title
* Session organizer's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, mailing address, phone, fax, and e-mail address
* Moderator's name, institutional affiliation, discipline, position or title, and contact information (if you do not identify a moderator, we will locate one for you)
* Speakers' names, institutional affiliations, disciplines, positions or titles, mailing addresses, phones, faxes, and e-mail addresses
* A maximum 500-word rationale for the roundtable
* Brief (2-3 sentence) scholarly biography of each speaker
Send proposals by April 15, 2011 To: msa13@buffalo.edu